Malioboro Street and Beringharjo Traditional Market Yogyakarta

Malioboro Street, Yogyakarta

Malioboro Street

Jalan Malioboro (English: Malioboro Street) is a major shopping street in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. The name is also used more generally for the neighborhood around the street. It lies north-south axis in the line between Yogyakarta Kraton (Sultan Palace) and Mount Merapi. This is in itself is significant to many of the local population, the north south orientation between the palace and the volcano being of importance.

Malioboro Street, Yogyakarta

The street is the centre of Yogyakarta’s largest tourist district surrounded with many hotels and restaurants nearby. Sidewalks on both sides of the street are crowded with small stalls selling a variety of goods. In the evening several open-air streetside restaurants, called lesehan, operate along the street. Less obvious to the tourist, but more for the local population, side streets, lanes and structures that lead on to Malioboro are as important as the street itself.

Malioboro

Beringharjo Traditional Market

Beringharjo market becomes part of Malioboro that is worth visiting. This market has been center of economy activity since years ago and its existence has philosophical meaning. The market that had been renovated several times symbolizes stages of human life that is busily engaged in its economy fulfillment. Furthermore, Beringharjo is also one of the ‘four in one’ poles (consisting of South Square, Sultan Palace, North Square, and Beringharjo market) symbolizing economy functions.

Beringharjo Traditional Market

The area where current Beringharjo market lies used to be forest of banyan trees. Soon after the foundation of Ngayogyakarta Hadiningrat Kingdom, i.e. in 1758, the area was used as a place for economy transaction by the people of Yogayarkta and its vicinities. Only hundreds years later, namely in 1925, the transaction place had a permanent building. The name ‘Beringharjo’ was given by Hamengku Buwono IX, meaning that the place where banyan tree (bering) used to grow is expected to bring welfare (harjo). Now, tourists define this place as an enjoyable shopping place.

Beringharjo Traditional Market

The front part and the western part of the market are the right places to find delicious traditional snacks. At the north side of the front part, you will find round brem (a kind of snack made from the extract of fermented tubers) that is softer than that of Madiun city and krasikan (sweet cake made from glutinous rice and palm sugar). In the south part, you will find bakpia cake filled with mung bean that is sold warm and wet snacks such as hung kwe and nagasari. Meanwhile, at the back part, usually they sell durable snacks such as ting-ting made of caramel mixed with peanut.

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